South Sudan

In 2011, the United States played a key role in securing a peaceful referendum and independence for South Sudan. Now, the world’s newest nation is in need of our help once again.

Since fighting started in December 2013 between President Salva Kiir and his former vice president Riek Machar, an estimated 50,000 people have been killed, 1.9 million people have been forced from their homes and the threat of widespread famine looms.

Time is running out for millions of people in South Sudan.

A year after the war began, there are dangerous warning signs of increased fighting and potential genocide.

Read full history


The Growing Conflict

south-sudan-boy-700South Sudan has struggled with some of the worst development indicators in the world and ongoing tensions both with Sudan and between ethnic groups internally.

High-level political disputes, particularly between former Vice President Riek Machar and President Salva Kiir, eventually led to the dissolution of the cabinet and the firing of Riek Machar. Tensions came to a head when members of the presidential guard and members of the army loyal to Machar fought in the capital, Juba, in December 2013.

The violence has spiraled ever since taking on an ethnic dimension with Machar, ethnically Nuer, leading a group of rebels against President Salva Kiir, ethnically Dinka.

Both the government and the rebels have committed atrocities and international efforts to address the crisis continue.

Continued Conflict with Sudan

bashirThe civil war between the north and south of Sudan resulted in the deaths of an estimated two million people and displaced an additional three million.

Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir’s forces not only directly attacked the South but also manipulated tribal tensions to create internal conflicts that still persists today.

South Sudan has further been destabilized by an influx of some 220,000 refugees into border areas fleeing attacks by the Sudanese government.

Tensions between Sudan and South Sudan also remain over disputed oil transit fees from South Sudan to Sudan.

This situation threatens not only the economic well-being of both countries which are both heavily dependent on oil revenues, but also a return to war.


South Sudan, A Country in Jeopardy

UNCamp-Juba-UNphoto-JC-McIlwaine300xTime is running out for millions of people in South Sudan. A year after the war began, there are dangerous warning signs of increased fighting and potential genocide.

Since fighting started in December 2013 between President Salva Kiir and his former vice president Riek Machar, an estimated 50,000 people have been killed, 1.9 million people have been forced from their homes and the threat of widespread famine looms.

Without security, food or a political settlement in sight, it’s not a question of if — but when — fighting will resume.

Our commitment to the world’s newest nation must not waiver. Add your name and tell President Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry to take immediate action for the people of South Sudan.

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